Diamond

The Stone of Invincibility

 

Wealth, Victory, Everlasting Love

 

A legend claims the God of Mines called his courtiers to bring together all the world’s known gems: Rubies, Sapphires, Emeralds, etc., and he found them to be of all tints and colors and varying harnesses. He took one of each and crushed them; he compounded them together, and declared, “Let this be something that will combine the beauty of all.” He spoke, and lo, the Diamond was born…pure as a dewdrop and invincible in hardness. Yet when its ray is resolved in the spectrum, it displays all the colors of the gems from which it was made. Though it is a gem of winter, the color of ice, Diamond is a crystal of Light; its high frequency energy is dispersed into flashing prisms of brilliant “fire” that typifies the sun. It is a spiritual stone, a symbol of perfection and illumination. In addition to its spiritual power, Diamond has an unconquerable hardness, bringing victory, superior strength, fortitude and courage to its wearer. It is associated with lightning and fearlessness, and for its properties of protection. 

 

THE HISTORY OF DIAMONDS

Culturally, diamonds have had many stories and folklore associated with them due to their beauty and grace. In Sanskrit, diamonds are called “vajra” meaning lightning; in Hindu mythology lightning was used as weapon by Indra, the king of gods. Diamonds have cross-culturally depicted courage, invincibility and strength. Enchantingly, the Greeks interpreted the fire of the diamond as the symbolic flame of eternal love. Composed of pure carbon, the foundational element of life, it is the one and only “10” on the hardness scale, crystallized deep in the earth’s mantle under intense heat and pressure. Its name is derived from the Greek adamas, meaning “indomitable,” “unbreakable,” or “untamable,” and diaphanus, meaning "transparent".

Raw, uncut 1+ carat silver diamond
Raw, uncut 1+ carat silver diamond
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Mohs' Scale of mineral hardness
Mohs' Scale of mineral hardness

Diamond takes the first place, scoring a 10 but in reality is 4 times harder that the minerals with the number 9

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Loose diamonds
Loose diamonds
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THE COLOR OF THE DIAMOND
Diamonds occur in a variety of colors—steel gray, white, blue, yellow, orange, red, green, pink to purple, brown, and black. A chemically pure and structurally perfect diamond is perfectly transparent with no hue, or color. However, in reality almost no gem-sized natural diamonds are absolutely perfect. Depending on the hue and intensity of a diamond's coloration, a diamond's color can either detract from or enhance its value. For example, most white diamonds are discounted in price when more yellow hue is detectable, while intense pink or blue diamonds can be dramatically more valuable. Out of all colored diamonds, red diamonds are the rarest. Each of the major colors has a different level of rareness (and of course the price level reflects that rarity)

Color Variations
Color Variations
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Simple Color Chart
Simple Color Chart
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Diamond Color Chart
Diamond Color Chart
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The Hope Diamond
The Hope Diamond

The most famous diamond of our times The Hope Diamond is a large, 45.52-carat deep-blue diamond, and now housed in the National Gem and Mineral collection at the National Natural History Museum in Washington, D.C. It is notorious for supposedly being cursed. Is esiamted to worth an amazing $350 Millions

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ENGAGEMENT RINGS
Diamonds signify steadfast, enduring love because of their unmatched strength and beauty. The versatile look of diamonds enables them to be worn with any outfit, from an elegant cocktail dress to blue jeans. It’s no wonder diamond engagement rings are the most popular accompaniment to popping the question.
Although the tradition of giving a ring to the woman who has promised to become your bride goes back centuries, diamond engagement rings are a relatively recent innovation. Diamond engagement rings first became popular in the 1930s. In 1477, Archduke Maximillian of Austria commissioned the very first diamond engagement ring on record for his betrothed, Mary of Burgundy. This sparked a trend for diamond rings among European aristocracy and nobility.
The sentimental Victorians and the Edwardians popularized ornate engagement ring designs that mixed diamonds with other gemstones, precious metals and enamels.
In 1947, De Beers (owner and operator company of the diamond mines in South Africa) launched its now classic slogan, "A Diamond is Forever." A diamond's purity and sparkle have now become symbols of the depth of a man's commitment to the woman he loves in practically all corners of the world.
In 1992, the average cost of a diamond engagement ring was $1,500. Today, the average cost is closer to $5,000.